The Divided Sky
thelookingglassgallery:

"The Tower - Man’s Foley In Gaea’s Upheaval" by John Paul Olivares
starswaterairdirt:

Infrared image of the dark side of the rings of Uranus, take by the Keck Observatory, 2007

starswaterairdirt:

Infrared image of the dark side of the rings of Uranus, take by the Keck Observatory, 2007

theelegantuniverse:

pretty—patterns:

Alex Grey
magictransistor:

Friedrich Maurer. Der Compass der Weisen (The Compass of the Wise). 1782.

magictransistor:

Friedrich Maurer. Der Compass der Weisen (The Compass of the Wise). 1782.

pixalry:

Middle Earth Travel Posters - Created by The Green Dragon Inn

Prints are available for sale on Etsy.

Snoop Lion’s Reincarnated album has essentially changed my life tonight. 

Freshly buzzed head parts and a cat.

Freshly buzzed head parts and a cat.

megacosms:

Credit: Hubble Legacy Archive, NASA, ESA - Processing: Judy Schmidt
Explanation: Are stars better appreciated for their art after they die? Actually, stars usually create their most artistic displays as they die. In the case of low-mass stars like our Sun and M2-9 pictured above, the stars transform themselves from normal stars to white dwarfs by casting off their outer gaseous envelopes. The expended gas frequently forms an impressive display called a planetary nebula that fades gradually over thousand of years. M2-9, a butterfly planetary nebula 2100 light-years away shown in representative colors, has wings that tell a strange but incomplete tale. In the center, two stars orbit inside a gaseous disk 10 times the orbit of Pluto. The expelled envelope of the dying star breaks out from the disk creating the bipolar appearance. Much remains unknown about the physical processes that causeplanetary nebulae.

megacosms:

Credit: Hubble Legacy ArchiveNASAESA - Processing: Judy Schmidt

Explanation: Are stars better appreciated for their art after they die? Actually, stars usually create their most artistic displays as they die. In the case of low-mass stars like our Sun and M2-9 pictured above, the stars transform themselves from normal stars to white dwarfs by casting off their outer gaseous envelopes. The expended gas frequently forms an impressive display called a planetary nebula that fades gradually over thousand of years. M2-9, a butterfly planetary nebula 2100 light-years away shown in representative colors, has wings that tell a strange but incomplete tale. In the center, two stars orbit inside a gaseous disk 10 times the orbit of Pluto. The expelled envelope of the dying star breaks out from the disk creating the bipolar appearance. Much remains unknown about the physical processes that causeplanetary nebulae.